The Importance Of Being Earnest About Cultural Heritage

Stupa as cultural heritage

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you can’t have failed to see at least some of the media commentary on ongoing cuts to funding for cultural heritage (which I’m broadly defining as including intangible heritage, historic built environment, and archaeological investigation) . You might think, so what? Why is Culture important when the British economy shrank by 1.5% in the first quarter of 2021? Isn’t it right that we focus on supporting medicine, engineering, physical and biological sciences, dentistry, nursing and other healthcare disciplines that do tangible good? Isn’t Culture just a nice airy-fairy add on? Well, culture matters if you want to achieve the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDG).

Cuts to Archaeology Teaching Grants

Excavations at Bloomberg London

The grants that universities in England receive for teaching archaeology may be cut by 50%.
All archaeologists working in the UK are graduates. Not every recipient of an archaeology degree goes on to work in archaeology, but those that do provide tangible, quantifiable benefits to the country that are worth a quarter of a billion pounds every year.

Labor Shortage Mitigation

H Biz

Five years ago, HBI’s Christopher Dore gave a lecture to the Federation of Archaeological Managers and Employers (FAME). The U.K. was on the verge of an archaeological labor shortage and Dore was asked to talk about the lessons learned from the U.S. archaeological/CRM labor shortage of the middle 2000s, from approximately 2005-2007, and ending with the economic crisis or “great recession” in 2008. He presented things that U.K. firms could do, in advance, to minimize the problems that a labor shortage brings.

It is time to revisit those lessons.

Ethics Workshop at CIfA Conference

ethics workshop session identity

Starting at 0900 on 22nd April 2021, there will be an archaeological Ethics Workshop at the CIfA 2021 Online Conference, sponsored by the Register of Professional Archaeologists.

The way to dusty death

originally posted at https://heritagemanagement.org/the-way-to-dusty-death-by-kenneth-aitchison-phd-head-of-capability-mapping-the-heritage-management-organization/ Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, Creeps in this petty pace from day to day, To the last syllable of recorded time; And all our yesterdays have lighted fools. The way to dusty death Shakespeare – Macbeth Basse Santa Su is a quiet town, more than 300km upriver from the coast in The […]

The Heritage Education Network

Landward Research Ltd are very pleased to be supporting The Heritage Education Network (THEN). THEN are doing great work, building up an alliance of like-minded organisations to share information and connections for anyone who uses, manages, teaches, or creates information about past or present peoples and cultures. We think their annotated bibliography project is particularly […]

Secrets of the High Woods – Heritage Assets in Forestry Management

Landward Research Ltd are delighted to have worked with the South Downs National Park Authority to produce Guidelines for the Stewardship of Heritage Assets in Forestry Management, as part of the Secrets of the High Woods programme. Coralie Mills of Dendrochronicle and Gordon Brown of John Clegg & Co worked with Doug Rocks-Macqueen to write these […]